Well Woman Exams    

Exams Covered in the Well Woman Exam

Well woman exams are the first line of defense against diseases of the female reproductive system. Many women avoid the annual exam because they want to avoid the pelvic exam. We understand this concern, but we emphasize to our patients that the annual exam can save their lives. Perhaps most important, the annual well woman exam can detect early stages of cervical cancer. The only way to detect cervical cancer at this early stage is with the pelvic exam that is part of your annual well woman exam.

Women’s Physical Exam

The physical exam is much like what your general practitioner does. But, many patients find it more convenient to do this during their well woman exam instead. Your gynecologist will review your medical history and ask about any current issues. They will check your vital signs, heartbeat, lungs, head, neck, abdomen, and reflexes. Sometimes they will ask for blood work to check your cholesterol, etc.

Breast Exam

Breast exams help detect breast cancer signs early. Your gynecologist looks for lumps or irregularities in your breasts. They will also teach you how to perform a self-examination for between visits. Women between 20 and 39 should get an exam every one to three years. Those 40 and above should get a breast exam — along with a mammogram — every year.

Pelvic Exam

Pelvic exams help detect early stage cancers, sexually transmitted diseases, and causes of inflammation. Your gynecologist examines the size and position of your ovaries, uterus, cervix, and vagina. Women 21 and over should get a yearly pelvic exam. Those under 21 should get one if experiencing menstrual disorder, vaginal discharge, or pelvic pain.

Pap Smear Teat

Pap smear tests help us detect early forms of cervical cancer. Your gynecologist gently scrapes cells from your cervix during a pelvic exam. Women 21 and above — and those sexually active for over three years — should have this test done every other year.

Contact Us Today

Your doctor needs to know all of your healthcare concerns to best care for you, and an annual exam is an ideal time to share issues, problems or concerns. If you haven’t had an annual well-woman exam in the last year, please call us today at (915)591-6559.

 

Gynecology Q & A

Why are gynecology exams important?

Gynecology exams are critically important for women of all ages because they include special assessments aimed at evaluating a woman's special health needs as she gets older and passes through different stages of life. A women's health can be optimized based on the specific health issue she is facing. Plus, gynecology exams can help identify subtle signs of diseases in their earliest stages so they can be appropriately and promptly treated. This also ensures women receive the health screenings and lifestyle guidance they need based on their individual risk factors.
 

What happens during a routine exam?

The visit starts with measurements of weight and blood pressure followed by a personal and family history to look for potential risk factors for disease. Lifestyle, any symptoms, as well as medications or supplements being taken are discussed. The exam includes an examination of the thyroid, breasts, heart, lungs, abdomen, and extremities. Then a pelvic exam, except in virgins, is gently performed along with a Pap test according to screening guidelines which will be determined at the visit.

Gynecology Procedures

Colposcopy

Colposcopy (kol-POS-kuh-pee) is a procedure to closely examine your cervix, vagina and vulva for signs of disease. During colposcopy, your doctor uses a special instrument called a colposcope.

Your doctor may recommend colposcopy if your Pap test result is abnormal. If your doctor finds an unusual area of cells during colposcopy, a sample of tissue can be collected for laboratory testing (biopsy).

Many women experience anxiety before their colposcopy exams. Knowing what to expect during your colposcopy may help you feel more comfortable. >more information

LEEP

LEEP stands for “loop electrosurgical excision procedure.” It’s named for the tool the doctor uses and how the tool works. It has a wire loop on the end. An electric current heats the wire loop so your doctor can remove (excise) some cells and tissue on your cervix or in your vagina. A LEEP usually takes about 10 to 20 minutes. In most cases, you can have it done at your doctor's office. >more information

Contact Us Today

Your doctor needs to know all of your healthcare concerns to best care for you, and an annual exam is an ideal time to share issues, problems or concerns. If you haven’t had an annual well-woman exam in the last year, please call us today at (915)591-6559.